Australia

Australia Government regulates the ingredients used in the production and importation of cosmetic products in Australia. Cosmetic products should fulfill the requirement of Cosmetic Standard 2007 which is an amendment of the Industrial Chemical (Notification and Assessment) Act 1989.

The definition of cosmetics in Australia is similar as that of the EU and US, i.e. a substance intended to contact with any external part of the human body, including the mucous membranes of the oral cavity and teeth, in order to clean, to change the appearance of, and to alter odor. Ingredients in cosmetic products are classified as industrial chemicals, and new cosmetic ingredients (not yet listed in the Australian Inventory of Chemical Substances) are subject to notification to the National Industrial Chemicals Notification Assessment Scheme (NICNAS) for assessment unless they qualify for an exemption. Manufacturers and importers can check the conditions or restrictions of chemicals which are available for use in Australia, using the Australian Inventory of Chemical Substances (AICS) and the NICNAS Cosmetics Guidelines.

In addition to regulation of cosmetic ingredients, there are also mandatory labeling requirement on cosmetic products according to the Trade Practices (Consumer Product Information Standards) (Cosmetics) Regulations 1991. The list of ingredients should be listed on the packaging or on the product itself if it does not contain packaging.

The following products are regulated as therapeutic goods and are not regulated as cosmetics:

Products that meet the definition of therapeutic goods in the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989 including products that are for preventing, diagnosing, curing or alleviating a disease, ailment, defect or injury in persons;

Primary sunscreens with SPF ≥ 4 as defined in AS/NZS 2604:1998;

Antibacterial skin products where medicinal claim is presented on the label;

Personal lubricants.

Canada

All cosmetics sold to consumers in Canada must meet the requirements of the Food and Drugs Act, the current Cosmetic Regulations, and all other applicable legislation to ensure that they are safe to use and do not pose any health risk.

The Cosmetic Regulations of the Food and Drugs Act require that cosmetics sold in Canada must be manufactured, prepared, preserved, packed and stored under sanitary conditions. Manufacturer or importer must submit a product notification form to the Health Canada within 10 days of placing the product on the market.

Canadian cosmetics regulations, like European Union regulations, are stricter than those in the United States.The Canadian government recently created a Cosmetic Ingredient Hotlist that includes hundreds of prohibited and restricted chemicals and contaminants such as formaldehyde, triclosan, selenium, nitrosamines and 1,4-dioxane — all of which are allowed in U.S. products.

China

In order to regulate the management and inspection of import and export cosmetics, the State Administration for Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine (SAEIQ) has, in addition to issuing the Procedures for Administration of Inspection of Import and Export Cosmetic Products, introduced a new system of inspecting the quality and labeling of import and export cosmetics which comes into effect on April 1,2000.

The Procedures provide that all import and export cosmetic products must undergo verification of their labeling and obtain a verification certificate before being submitted for inspection.

E.U.

Council Directive 76/768/EEC

Cosmetics marketed in the European Communities, whether manufactured locally or imported from abroad, must be in compliance wit the EU Council Directive for cosmetic 76/768/EEC to safeguard public health when applied under normal conditions of us.

REACH

REACH stands for the Regulation for Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals. The REACH Regulation entered into force on 1st June 2007 to streamline and improve the former legislative framework for chemicals of the European Union (EU). REACH is an European Community Regulation that directly applies in all Member States of the European Union. As REACH is of EEA (European Economic Area) relevance, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway will apply REACH after it has been incorporated into the agreement of European Economic Area. Substances imported in the Community from Switzerland (a non EU country belonging to EFTA (European Free Trade Association) but
not to EEA) are treated under REACH in the same way as substances imported from any other non-EU country.

Non-Community manufacturers do not have direct obligations under the REACH Regulation. It is the importer established within the Community, who needs to comply with the REACH obligations.

Russia

GOST R Certificate of Conformity

Goods exported to Russia are subject to one or a combination of mandatory certification systems, which includes GOST R Certificate of Conformity, the most commonly required permissive document in order to be approved by relevant Russian authorities in terms of compliance to Russian standards.
Basically, almost all consumer products require the mandatory certification; it includes all food products, products for children, perfume and cosmetics, tableware and kitchenware, packaging materials, household and industrial equipment, etc.

Sanitary-Epidemiological Conclusion Certificate (or Hygienic Certificate)

It confirms that products, activities or technical conditions conform to applicable hygienic standards and sanitary regulations in Russia.
The Sanitary-Epidemiological Conclusion Certificate is a pre-requisite for obtaining a GOST R Certificate of Conformity .

Russia

GOST R Certificate of Conformity

Goods exported to Russia are subject to one or a combination of mandatory certification systems, which includes GOST R Certificate of Conformity, the most commonly required permissive document in order to be approved by relevant Russian authorities in terms of compliance to Russian standards.
Basically, almost all consumer products require the mandatory certification; it includes all food products, products for children, perfume and cosmetics, tableware and kitchenware, packaging materials, household and industrial equipment, etc.

Sanitary-Epidemiological Conclusion Certificate (or Hygienic Certificate)

It confirms that products, activities or technical conditions conform to applicable hygienic standards and sanitary regulations in Russia.
The Sanitary-Epidemiological Conclusion Certificate is a pre-requisite for obtaining a GOST R Certificate of Conformity .

Saudi Arabia

Product Conformity Programme
Every consignment of imported goods must be accompanied by a Conformity Certificate. Intertek is authorized to issue these Certificates. They are needed to ensure Customs clearance of shipments and confirm the products comply with the relevant Saudi technical regulations and national, regional or international standards.

Effective 27 January 2009 all imported consignments must bear a non-removable indication of origin. Those that do not will be held by Saudi Customs and the Importer asked to take corrective action or provide an undertaking that the offence will not be repeated. Failure to do so could result in a fine or goods being returned to their country of origin.

U.A.E.

The Dubai Government regulates the manufacture, sale and importation of cosmetic products by requiring that all cosmetic products to be registered prior to placing in Dubai market; as well by requiring the individuals running the activities related to cosmetics to be licensed in Dubai.

Since consumer safety is the primary principle of cosmetics registration, its process allows the CPSS(Consumer Products Safety Section) to gather adequate information to assess the safety of cosmetic products. It is necessary to emphasize that no cosmetic product shall be manufactured, imported, exported, advertised, sold or distributed in Dubai unless it has been registered in accordance with DM regulation.
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U.S.

Cosmetic products imported into the United States are subject to the same laws and regulations as those produced in the United States. They must be safe for their intended uses and contain no prohibited ingredients, and all labeling and packaging must be informative and truthful, with the labeling information in English (or Spanish in Puerto Rico). All color additives must be approved by FDA; many cannot be used unless certified in FDA’s own laboratories. If the product has an intended use that causes it to be considered a drug, it must comply with the requirements for drugs, including establishment registration and drug listing.

Cosmetic firms are encouraged to register their establishments and file Cosmetic Product Ingredient Statements with FDA’s Voluntary Cosmetic Registration Program (VCRP). However, firms importing products considered to be solely cosmetics in the United States are not required to register with FDA, and a registration number is not required for importing cosmetics into the United States.